Pasifika Migration to New Zealand: social and cultural influences 1800-2010

This item comes from University of Canterbury Library and is part of their collection UC Research Repository
Please view the item on their site for the definitive information on how it can be used.

This item is a research paper. It was created by

on or around the date 2013.

This is the best description of this item that we could find:

This lecture traces the historiography of Pasifika migration on Aotearoa New Zealand from 1820 to 2010. Early Pacific Islanders within New Zealand were often referred to as ‘Oahuans’ or ‘Kanaka’, a term derivative from local Maori. ‘Nigger’ was also used, but not by Maori. Later in the 20th century Pacific migrants were termed as ‘Islanders’, ‘FOBs’ or ‘coconuts’. Pacific Islanders provided a source of cheap labour for New Zealand’s fledgling economy. It was hoped that Pacific Islanders, having their own colonial past, would be able to slip into New Zealand society. Numbers of Pacific Islanders in New Zealand were at first small: 1,000 in 1920 rising to 65,000 by the mid 1970s to 200,000 in 1996. Following the economic decline of the 1970s many unskilled jobs were lost and racial tension emerged. Moral panic peaked with the ‘dawn raids’ on Pacific Island homes – Samoans and Tongans in particular were targeted. Bad PI images floated before our eyes in newspapers and television screens. Post 1980s, as trade links with Britian shrank and in search for a national identity to sell to the global marketplace, Pasifika culture infused into New Zealand’s mainstream culture via music, fashion and ways of speaking; it is a trendy and marketable identity. New Zealand is now home to fourth and fifth generation Pacific Islanders; many have actively contributed to the arts such as Michel Tuffrey, John Pule, Tusiata Avia and Albert Wendt and the sporting arena including Valerie Adams, Vilimaina Davu, and Joe Rokocoko. Tongans, Samoans, Fijians, Cook Islanders, Niuens and Tokelauans in New Zealand are no longer generic ‘Oahuans’ or ‘PIs’; they have become household names and their heroic fetes have been written into the historiography of our national identity. Locale has won out.


What is the copyright status of this item?


All Rights Reserved

This item is all rights reserved, which means you'll have to get permission from University of Canterbury Library before using it.

More Information

You can learn more about the rights status of this item at: http://library.canterbury.ac.nz/ir/rights.shtml

More Information

You can learn more about the rights status of this item at: http://library.canterbury.ac.nz/ir/rights.shtml

All Rights Reserved

This item is all rights reserved, which means you'll have to get permission from University of Canterbury Library before using it.

More Information

You can learn more about the rights status of this item at: http://library.canterbury.ac.nz/ir/rights.shtml

More Information

You can learn more about the rights status of this item at: http://library.canterbury.ac.nz/ir/rights.shtml

What can I do with this item?


You must always check with University of Canterbury Library to confirm the specific terms of use, but this is our understanding:

Non-infringing use

NZ Copyright law does not prevent every use of a copyright work. You should consider what you can and cannot do with a copyright work.

No sharing

You may not copy and/or share this item with others without further permission. This includes posting it on your blog, using it in a presentation, or any other public use.

No modifying

You are not allowed to adapt or remix this item into any other works.

No commercial use

You may not use this item commercially.

What can I do with this item?


You must always check with University of Canterbury Library to confirm the specific terms of use, but this is our understanding:

Non-infringing use

NZ Copyright law does not prevent every use of a copyright work. You should consider what you can and cannot do with a copyright work.

You may not copy and/or share this item with others without further permission. This includes posting it on your blog, using it in a presentation, or any other public use.

No modifying

You are not allowed to adapt or remix this item into any other works.

No commercial use

You may not use this item commercially.