Owls, Owls, & More Owls

By richard

The Owl is the greatest creature on the planet.

Owl

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Many owl species have asymmetrical ears. When located at different heights on the owl’s head, their ears are able to pinpoint the location of sounds in multiple dimensions. Ready, aim, strike.

Image: Little Owl
Little Owl

NatureWatch NZ

The eyes of an owl are not true “eyeballs.” Their tube-shaped eyes are completely immobile, providing binocular vision which fully focuses on their prey and boosts depth perception.

Owls can rotate their necks 270 degrees. A blood-pooling system collects blood to power their brains and eyes when neck movement cuts off circulation.

Owls hunt other owls. Great Horned Owls are the top predator of the smaller Barred Owl.

Image: Laughing owl
Laughing owl

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Little owl
Little owl

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Little Owl
Little Owl

NatureWatch NZ

Image: Little owl with dead thrush
Little owl with dead thrush

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Barn Owl
Barn Owl

Dunedin Public Art Gallery

A group of owls is called a parliament. This originates from C.S. Lewis’ description of a meeting of owls in The Chronicles of Narnia.

The tiniest owl in the world is the Elf Owl, which is 5 - 6 inches tall and weighs about 1 ½ ounces. The largest North American owl, in appearance, is the Great Gray Owl, which is up to 32 inches tall.

The Northern Hawk Owl can detect—primarily by sight—a vole to eat up to a half a mile away.

Fun facts from here.

Image: Wellington
Wellington

Auckland Libraries