Tokoroa - Our timber town stories

By Zokoroa

A pictorial journey through Tokoroa's earliest beginnings from its growth as a farming community and timber town, to it nearly becoming a city, together with stories from 'locals'.

Tokoroa, South Waikato, Waikato, Timber, Farming, Kinleith, Housing, Schools, Moa, Woodchopping

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Tokoroa lies at the heart of the North Island's South Waikato district.  When you think of 'Tokoroa' what springs to mind?  -  Timber town? The sulphurous smell of Kinleith Mill? NZ Forest Product houses?  Wood chopping at the annual A.&P. Show? Pasifika / Māori / European community?  Local RSA cricket picnics?  TT2 ice blocks and jelly tips at the dairy?  Pie cart munchies? Those are some of my memories from my childhood days and teen years growing up in Tokoroa. Here's a pictorial journey of Tokoroa's earliest beginnings from its growth as a farming community and timber town, to it nearly becoming a city  - yes, nearly a city! 

Image: Rail routes, 1950–1980

Heart of the South Waikato

Rail routes, 1950–1980

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Tokoroa

Early Tokoroa township with NZ Forest Product houses

Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Kinleith pulp and paper mill

Kinleith Mill

Kinleith pulp and paper mill

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

TELL US - LOCAL STORIES

What memories do you have of Tokoroa?  Were you born there? Grew up or worked there? Or travelled by on the State Highway and had a rest stop? Here are some recollections shared by 'locals'....  

THE TALKING POLES

Positioned around the town are 'talking poles' which depict the diversity of cultures in the Tokoroa community. Several poles are made from pine and other local woods, to reflect Tokoroa's forestry heritage. See the Talking Poles Index for a description of the many poles on display, which will eventually number 60, and the story each pole tells.

Image: ‘Raukawa’

Raukawa 'talking pole': The ancestor of Ngāti Raukawa

‘Raukawa’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: ‘Pacific memories’

Pacific memories 'talking pole'

‘Pacific memories’

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Pine man, Tokoroa

Pine Man 'talking pole'

Pine man, Tokoroa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

QUIRKY TALES 

Hands up who remembers Tokoroa's legendary pie cart in Leith Place near SH 1 and it didn't sell pies! (See article).  How's this for ingenuity - chess players miles apart in Tokoroa and Gisborne relaying their moves via the Amateur Radio Transmitters Club! Did you hear the tale about wild dogs on the loose in the early days?

Image: tokoroa nz

Pie Cart

The 'Tokoroa special' = chips, grated cheese and mayo. (And pies weren't on the menu!)

tokoroa nz

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Radio Chess Match

Chess by radio

Tokoroa and Gisborne Chess Clubs battle it out! (1962 photo)

Radio Chess Match

Gisborne Photo News

Wild dogs on the loose

WILD DOGS (Colonist, 14 May 1913)

National Library of New Zealand

FASCINATING FACTS: MOA, ROCK ART & CARVINGS

Tokoroa is one of a very few known inland North Island moa hunter sites.  Yes, moa!  Excavations on farmland near the Matarawa Stream have uncovered moa bones, early adzes, and obsidian flakes. (See: An inland archaic site and Tokoroa moa-hunter site.) The Council and Pūtake Taiao are involved with the ongoing management of this historic reserve, known as Te Tokotokoroa a Matarawa, which lies to the west of James Higgins Park.  Rock art with ochre markings and carvings (including a canoe) have also been discovered in small shelters in ignimbrite cliffs near Tokoroa, along with a number of objects - waka huia lid, obsidian flakes, chert flake, adze, bird bone toggle, wooden comb top and a stone pounder. (See Archaeology in the Bay of Plenty.)

Image: Moa diversity

The small ‘bush’ moa, Euryapteryx Curtis, has been found in Tokoroa

Moa diversity

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: NZ Forest Products Ltd, Tokoroa, South Waikato

Moa bones found near Matarawa Stream on west side of Tokoroa houses

NZ Forest Products Ltd, Tokoroa, South Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

MUSICAL  / ARTISTIC JOURNEYS

Did you watch music shows like "The Grunt Machine" and "Radio with Pictures" on the TV?  And did you enjoy Tokoroa's pub scene with groups like soul funk band Shriek Machine who appeared on NZ telly and later renamed themselves Collision (See article)?  What other musicians and artists came from Tokoroa?  

Image: Music reviewer Grant Smithies

Soul funk legends - Collision

(ex-Shriek Machine) toured with Dalvanius, Tina Turner, Commodores and others

Music reviewer Grant Smithies

Radio New Zealand

Image: Jenny Morris

Singer Jenny Morris

Sang with Wide Mouthed Frogs, The Crocodiles, QED, INXS (backing vocals) & went solo. (Love 'Body and Soul' LP)

Jenny Morris

AudioCulture

Image: The Expats: UK based author Stella Duffy

Author Stella Duffy

Author and theatre director

The Expats: UK based author Stella Duffy

Radio New Zealand

MULTICULTURAL STORIES

Tokoroa's diverse community was celebrated with a variety of festivals, including the Māori Cultural Festival, the Polynesian Festival and the Tokoroa A.&.P. Show Festival.

Māori Culture:  The southern Waikato and northern Taupō are the ancestral home of  Ngāti Raukawa. (See Te Ara's Story: Ngāti Raukawa).  I recall students at our Tokoroa East School being part of the Kapa Haka group. At Tokoroa Intermediate, students learnt tāniko weaving and piupiu making, which they gave displays of during the Tokoroa Māori Festival held at the Tokoroa New Memorial Hall.

Image: Hui ā Tau 1995

Papa-o-te Aroha Marae, Tokoroa

Hui ā Tau 1995

NZEI Te Riu Roa (New Zealand Educational Institute)

Image: Hui ā Tau 1995
Hui ā Tau 1995

NZEI Te Riu Roa (New Zealand Educational Institute)

Pacific Cultures: Large numbers of Pacific Island people, including from the Cook Islands, Samoa, Fiji, Tonga and Niue, emigrated to work at the Kinleith Mill. On Sundays, you would see beautifully dressed women wearing colourful flowers in their hair outside the St Luke's Pacific Islanders Presbyterian Church on Maraetai Road.   

Image: Tokoroa

Samoan 'talking pole'

Tokoroa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Group of Pacific Islanders ready to travel by bus to Tokoroa for the opening of a new church

1958: Pacific Islanders Church opens

Group of Pacific Islanders ready to travel by bus to Tokoroa for the opening of a new church

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Polynesian festival, 2004
Polynesian festival, 2004

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

European Cultures:  Workers attracted to Tokoroa included assisted immigrants from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. The expectation that Tokoroa would become NZ's next city was an added drawcard for others living elsewhere in NZ during the late 1950s - 70s. Family traditions were reflected in the forms of entertainment, which included Scottish dancing and balls. The annual social highlight was the Tokoroa A.&P. Show - you could 'show' animals, enjoy amusement park games, eat pink candyfloss, and watch the 'must-see' event - the woodchopping and sawing competitions! 

Image: 1993 Tokoroa Ball

Scottish dancing at the Tokoroa Ball

1993 Tokoroa Ball

Hamilton City Libraries

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

A.&P. Festival at the Memorial Showgrounds

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: The chips were down and flying

Competing at wood chopping thoughout NZ

The chips were down and flying

Nelson Photo News

Woodchopping events:  

If you were born or lived in Tokoroa for a number of years it has been said you have woodchopping in the blood and can 'smell' the sawdust for an event  miles away!  The Tokoroa A.&P. Show's woodchopping was a popular event where family, friends and interested onlookers cheered on the competitors. The two-day Tokoroa Golden Axe Festival is the premier woodchopping competition with open and  championship events that draw competitors nationwide and internationally.  You can view 'action' videos on Youtube.     

Image: Woodchopping at the A&P Show

Standing block chopping. Top axemen take less than 20 secs with a 10 inch log.

Woodchopping at the A&P Show

mychillybin

Image: Woodchopping contest, Royal Easter Show 1965, Sydney Showground

Wood chopping: NZ & overseas continues today

Woodchopping contest, Royal Easter Show 1965, Sydney Showground

Trove

WEEKEND LEISURE

Leisure hour activities have varied over the decades. In the sixties, for example, you could go to the movies, public library, roller skating rink or pursue club or sporting interests. Pocket money treats included TT2 iceblock, jelly tip, topsy, and pineapple lumps. Children in our neighbourhood socialised by playing marble games, enjoying tennis on the road, making kites, and racing home-built trolleys down the nearby hilly road. We also swam in the Matarawa Stream and a dam was built in 1975 to create Lake Moananui. Our street (Elizabeth Drive) also started up a library in a small shed in the mid-sixties where we could swap our children's books. 

Image: Marbles

Marble games

Our neighbourhood sport of champions

Marbles

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Image: Australia claims Pineapple Lumps

Iconic pineapple lumps

available in NZ since 1935

Australia claims Pineapple Lumps

TV3

Image: Tokoroa - beautiful autumn!

Man-made Lake Moananui

Created when dam placed across Matarawa Stream (1975)

Tokoroa - beautiful autumn!

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

CLUB & VOLUNTEER CULTURE

The community spirit in Tokoroa was evident with the number of clubs and volunteer organisations. Social watering holes included the RSA, Tokoroa Club and Cosmopolitan, in addition to the Tokoroa Hotel, the Timberlands and the Trees Tavern. The RSA organised commemorative Anzac ceremonies and activities, like the family cricket picnics held in Tokoroa and at Hamilton's Lake Rotoroa.  Young people could join groups like the Red Cross, St. John's and the Scouts/Guides. Community projects were supported through organisations like the Jaycees and Lions Club. Volunteers also helped the St. John Ambulance Service and the Tokoroa Volunteer Fire Brigade - the town siren would sound the alarm and you'd see workers sprinting to the fire engine. And the list goes on.... 

Image: Tokoroa war memorial
Tokoroa war memorial

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Large fire breaks out at Tokoroa mill

TOKOROA VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE

Large fire breaks out at Tokoroa mill

Television New Zealand

SPORTING EXPLOITS

The Tokoroa Memorial Sportsground  was the place to be for sporting and social activities that brought the community together, and is now home to  the South Waikato Sport and Events Centre. Sporting memories include frosty Saturday mornings playing netball and spending summery days at the Athletics Club and the town swimming baths. The Tokoroa East Bowling Club, which was located by the netball courts, flourished in local and regional competitions, until it closed due to falling numbers. Locals also headed along the road to the golf course or out into the bush country for off-road biking, pig hunting and eeling. You could tell when Kinleith workers were on strike by the number of vehicles parked on the side of the highway - pighunters and their dogs were busy in the forests!

Image: NEW SWIMMING BATHS AT TOKOROA

Swimming baths (1943)

NEW SWIMMING BATHS AT TOKOROA

Auckland Libraries

Image: Making The Go-Karts Go

Go-karting (1961)

Making The Go-Karts Go

Gisborne Photo News

Image: Records Smashed

Athletics (1967)

Records Smashed

Gisborne Photo News

Sporting stars: 

Over the years various sports 'stars' have had their turn in the spotlight in NZ and overseas. For example, see article on rugby players which includes being in the All Blacks (naturally!).    

STORY OF TOKOROA'S BEGINNINGS

The origin of the town's name is possibly taken from the nearby 'Tokoroa Plains' which appear on 19th-century maps. The surveyor may have commemorated Tokoroa, a chief of the Ngāti Kahupungapunga, who was killed by the invading Ngāti Raukawa during the 1600s. (See Te Ara and the Journal of the Polynesian Society.) During the Government's negotiations for land in the Patetere District of the Waikato, parts of the Tokoroa Block were subdivided off (1881). 'For sale' advertisements were placed in N.Z. and England to attract settler farmers.  

FARMING SETTLEMENT

A small farming settlement began with sheep and dairy cattle during the early 1900s. Initially the land surrounding Tokoroa was owned by the Thames Valley Land Company and then the Matarawa Land Company from 1914.  Land sales were slow due to the quality of the pumice soils causing 'bush sickness' in animals. After the soil's cobalt deficiencies were addressed in the 1930s, the farming of stock became more profitable. 

FORESTRY INDUSTRY: EXOTIC TIMBERS 

The Taupo Totara Timber Company (TTT) was set up in  Putaruru in 1901 by a group of Wellingtom businessmen, to harvest stands of totara and matai south of Tokoroa.  A sawmill (the district's first) was established in 1903 at Kopokorahi, near Kinleith. In the 1970s, TTT was taken over by NZ Forest Products, which eventually became part of Carter Holt Harvey.  

Image: Sawmill, Tokoroa, Waikato

Timber sawmill

Sawmill, Tokoroa, Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa 1952

Tree-felling by axe (1952)

Tokoroa 1952

Auckland Libraries

Image: Tokoroa 1952

Crane loading logging truck (1952)

Tokoroa 1952

Auckland Libraries

Image: Tokoroa 1952

Transporting logs on bush road (1952)

Tokoroa 1952

Auckland Libraries

Image: Tokoroa 1952

Bank of circular saws (1952)

Tokoroa 1952

Auckland Libraries

Image: Tokoroa 1952

Stacking sawn timber (1952)

Tokoroa 1952

Auckland Libraries

A private bush railway line was built from Putaruru to Mokai which started transporting logs in 1905. Three years later goods and passengers were carried. With the cutting out of the bush at Mokai, dismantling the line was commenced in 1944. The Ministry of Works constructed a much heavier line on the site of the light railway to serve the Kinleith mills in 1948.  

Image: Tokoroa, South Waikato

Putaruru - Kinleith line passes through township

Tokoroa, South Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

FORESTRY INDUSTRY: PINUS RADIATA

With the pumice soil suitable for forestry, pine forests were planted from 1925 by New Zealand Perpetual Forests which evolved into New Zealand Forest Products (NZFP).  The next lot of planting was carried out NZFP in 1935. When these trees matured in the 1940s, a sawmill and a pulp and paper mill were set up at Kinleith.

Image: Pine forest at Tokoroa

1938: Pinus radiata

Pine forest at Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Timber industry, Tokoroa

1948

Timber industry, Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Pine plantations, Tokoroa

1948

Pine plantations, Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

KINLEITH MILL: 1954 - 

The Kinleith Mill was built by NZFP eight kilometres south of the Tokoroa township. It is located alongside the Putaruru-Taupo Highway and the Government-owned railway line which was extended from Putaruru to Kinleith in 1952.  In 1954 the works began producing timber, pulp, and paper.  The Mill is named after the Kinleith paper mills near Edinburgh in Scotland, where NZFP founder director Sir David Henry served his papermaking apprenticeship. 

Image: Kinleith strike poster, 1980
Kinleith strike poster, 1980

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Logger Rhythms

Film about timber work at Tokoroa and Kawerau

from planting to felling to finished product (1984)

Logger Rhythms

NZ On Screen

Carter Holt Harvey bought the New Zealand Forest Products forests in 1991. As the plantations were cut down, former forestry land was converted into dairy farms. With the  fall in demand from export markets in Australia and a decline in new building projects in NZ,  the dairy farms were sold and the workforce numbers at Kinleith declined through redundancies.

TOWNSHIP DEVELOPMENT

Spot the changes in the township as the population grew!  Back in 1948 Tokoroa had 242 people. Population Census figures for the 1950s show the rate of increase: 1951 census = 1,193; 1956 census = 5,366; 1961 census = 7,054.  With the growth of Kinleith Mill, Tokoroa was  expected to become a city of 20,000 people. Instead, the population peaked in 1981 at 18,713 people and, thereafter, continued to fall as Kinleith reduced its operations.  

Housing Subdivisions:

To house its growing workforce, NZ Forest Products built 2,230 workers’ houses between 1947 - 1976, as well as camps for single men. From the 1960s, land was subdivided by private industry and the Matamata County Council.  As subdivisions were opened up for owner-built homes, the Matarawa Stream formed the western boundary for the township.

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato

1953:

Township planning spanning the Putaruru-Kinleith railway line

Tokoroa, Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa takes shape

1953:

Streets being laid out for housing Kinleith workers

Tokoroa takes shape

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

1958: Braeside Camp's single men's huts

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato

1958: Northern entrance

Township with Kinleith to the south, and farmland surroundings

Tokoroa, Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa

1963: Northern entrance

into town with Kinleith Mill to the south

Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa and Taupo: street map. 1st ed.

1966: Street map

Tokoroa and Taupo: street map. 1st ed.

University of Waikato

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato

1970: Shops and housing to the west

Tokoroa, Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, South Waikato

1976: Tokoroa Hospital in foreground

Looking northward with the Lake Moananui and Matarawa Stream on western boundary

Tokoroa, South Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, South Waikato

1976: Owner-built homes

Looking southward along Elizabeth Drive, with Matarawa Stream as western boundary

Tokoroa, South Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Shopping Centre:

Over the years there has been a range of stores, including Woolworths and, more recently, the Warehouse. In the 1960s, Friday night treats in front of cartoons on the TV were fish, battered sausages and chips. The local takeaway welcomed copies of the South Waikato News and NZ Herald newspapers to recycle as wrapping.  The dining out treat was at the Chinese restaurant in town. The choices for dining experiences have since increased, including the fast food outlets that can be seen today. 

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Shopping centre (1958)

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa

Shops and housing to the west (1963)

Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa

Timberlands opposite shops (1963)

Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, South Waikato

Shopping area by SH 1 (1976)

Tokoroa, South Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Modern shopping area in Bridge Street, Tokoroa

Shops at Leith Place (1976)

Modern shopping area in Bridge Street, Tokoroa

Archives New Zealand Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

Arrival of other businesses:

Image: Nihills Transport Limited,Tokoroa

Nihills Transport Ltd (1970)

Nihills Transport Limited,Tokoroa

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Plan of Tokoroa Mobile Telephone Control Station (1975)
Plan of Tokoroa Mobile Telephone Control Station (1975)

Archives New Zealand Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

SCHOOLING

The local schools were a social hub of the community drawing families together. The first school built was Tokoroa School (later renamed Tokoroa East) which opened in 1915 with a roll of 9 students and closed in 2010. (See The story of Tokoroa East School.)  In 1954 the second school opened and was named Tokoroa Central School. With further increases in the population, two more schools opened in  1965 - Tokoroa South School (now named Strathmore School), and Matarawa School (which later closed in 1999). As Tokoroa's population increased, new schools were built (see Wikipedia article) and tertiary education options were provided.

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Tokoroa East School (1958)

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Tokoroa East School (1959)

and Showgrounds on leftside of SH 1

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, South Waikato

Tokoroa East School (1976)

Tokoroa, South Waikato

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Tokoroa Central (1959)

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Tokoroa High School (1958)

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa School

Tokoroa High & Int (1963)

Tokoroa School

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Tokoroa High & Matarawa School (1969)

Tokoroa, Waikato Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Image: Politicians on the Campaign Trail

Secondary students interviewing Helen Clark on the campaign trail (2008)

Politicians on the Campaign Trail

Radio New Zealand

Image: Waiariki Institute of Technology

Regional Waiariki campus opened in 1978

Waiariki Institute of Technology

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Haere ra!