Power

A DigitalNZ Story by National Library of New Zealand Topics

The search for new sources of power will never end. This topic covers the science, technology and history of various sources of energy like hydro, nuclear, and fossil fuels. it also includes sustainable and renewable power including solar, wind and tidal power. SCIS no. 1933908

social_sciences, arts, health, history, maths, Māori

Wave-powered generator

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Wind power

Science Learning Hub

Exploring solar power

Science Learning Hub

Auckland blackout, 1998

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Roxburgh Dam, Otago Region

Alexander Turnbull Library

Dam wall, Arapuni Gorge

Alexander Turnbull Library

Building the Roxburgh dam

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

'Damn the dam'

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pylon, Taranaki, 2002

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The Line

NZ On Screen

Pictorial Parade No. 45 (1956)

Archives New Zealand Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

Anderson Steam Engine

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Loading coal

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Coal Range

Kete Horowhenua

The coal tree

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira

Poster, 'Coal Is Power'

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Coal on Greymouth Wharf

Alexander Turnbull Library

Windmill.

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira

The Road to Cloud Nine, Where Our New Attitude Energy is Supposed to Come From

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Biomass energy

Services to Schools

Living light

Services to Schools

Wind energy

Services to Schools

Energy

Services to Schools

Renewable energy

Services to Schools

Revolution now

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Types of energy

Services to Schools

What is energy?

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Māui gas platform

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Biofuel

Services to Schools

Nuclear fusion

Services to Schools

New Zealand wind energy

Services to Schools

Kaipara tidal power turbine

Tidal power, a renewable source of energy, uses underwater turbines and generators to convert the movement of tidal water into electricity. A tidal power station was to be built in the Kaipara Harbour, but marine environmental groups and NIWA were against this move. They stated that the turbines could destroy marine life and sea birds, especially snapper as the harbour acts as a nursery for this species. Local fishermen felt more testing was needed on tidal power to estimate its effectiveness.

Kaipara tidal power turbine. 19 February 2011

Alexander Turnbull Library

Making the wind work

People have used wind power to propel their ships and boats for thousands of years before they realised that wind could also be a source of power in other areas. It was in 1888 that inventor Charles Bush created the first wind turbine to create electricity for his mansion in Ohio, USA. This article from 1910 is about a British engineer and his wind-motor that promises to replace coal and gasoline. Wind is a much sought-after source of renewable and alternate energy. The Tararua wind farm located near Palmerston North is New Zealand’s largest wind farm.

MAKING THE WIND WORK. (Mataura Ensign 2-8-1910)

National Library of New Zealand

Stewart Lister in his solar energy powered car

Energy from the sun is an abundant and renewable source of energy. Solar panels generate electricity directly from the sun. This is an image of Solar Kiwi, a solar-powered car designed by New Zealanders, Vivianne and Stewart Lister displayed at the electronic vehicle symposium in Wellington. The couple raced their car in the World Solar Challenge held in Australia. Their average speed was 50 km/h.

Stewart Lister in his solar energy powered car - Photograph taken by Mark Coote

Alexander Turnbull Library

'If NZ had nuke power?

New Zealand’s nuclear story began in late 1955 when two prospectors Fredrick Cassin and Charles Jacobsen accidentally discovered uranium on the West Coast. Their Geiger counter began ticking wildly near the rock face. However, in 1987, David Lange’s Government passed the New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone, Disarmament, and Arms Control Act. Since then there have been debates about this act and the idea of nuclear energy as a source of alternate energy. This image plays on the idea of nuclear power in New Zealand and where these power stations might be located. In this case on or in front of some of our most iconic landscape features!

'If NZ had nuke power?..' 29 May, 2008

Alexander Turnbull Library

Wairakei Geothermal Power Station

The Wairakei power station lies beside the Waikato River around 7 km north of Taupo above an active volcanic zone It is the world’s second geothermal power station and the first to use steam from the geothermal water as an energy source to generate electricity. It was completed in 1963. Unfortunately, the Waikato Regional Council has reported that the power station has had a serious impact on the environment with the reduction of sinter-depositing springs, geysers and their ecosystems in the surrounding area.

Wairakei Geothermal Power Station, Taupo District

Alexander Turnbull Library

Hydropower

Services to Schools

Environment : energy

Services to Schools

Flight

DigitalNZ

EPIC

Services to Schools