Tuvalu

A DigitalNZ Story by National Library of New Zealand Topics

Tuvalu, one of the smallest countries of the world is made up of eight coral atolls. This set covers the history, government, culture and traditions of Tuvalu, including the devastation of climate change. SCIS no: 1942439

social_sciences, arts, history, health, science, technology

Tuvalu Language Week

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Tuvalu Clothes - Tales from Te Papa episode 48

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Tuvalu dance group

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Natives of Ellice Island Aurora Island and Raraka Islands

Alfred Agate, an American artist created many paintings during his service with the United States Expedition between 1838 to 1842. He is especially famous for his paintings of traditional cultures. This watercolour painting shows natives from Ellice Islands (now Tuvalu), Aurora Islands (now Maewo) and Raraka Islands in the Pacific Ocean. They are comfortably dressed in skirts made from leaves, and tapa cloth made from local fibres.

Natives of Ellices Group. Natives of Aurora Island clothed in tapa. Raraka Islander.

Alexander Turnbull Library

Tuvalu women perform in New Caledonia

The Pacific Arts Festival or FESTPAC is held every four years by a different Oceania country. This photograph shows Tuvalu women performing the traditional fatele dance, at the 8th Pacific Arts Festival held in New Caledonia in 2000. Their costumes made from locally sourced material such as pandanus leaves or fibre from hibiscus plants and are naturally dyed in bright colours for the occasion. The strips are attached to a waistband to form a titi (skirt). Included with the attire are headbands, armbands and wristbands, also made from natural materials.

Tuvalu women performing at the 8th Festival of Pacific Arts, Noumea, New Caledonia

Alexander Turnbull Library

Hurricane at the islands

A 1907 hurricane destroyed houses and coconut trees on the island of Nukulaelae in Tuvalu. Even today high tides and tropical cyclones are some of the extreme events that can cause huge damage to the island’s infrastructure. High winds and torrential rain can create storm surges that flood the islands, damaging trees, agriculture, roads and buildings. The highest point in Tuvalu is only 4.6 metres above sea level, making it even more vulnerable to flooding during tropical storms.

HURRICANE AT THE ISLANDS. (Otago Daily Times 22-6-1907)

National Library of New Zealand

'Show me your wallet!' 'Show me your passport!'

These two images contrast how New Zealand deals with visitors. While New Zealand Immigration welcomes tourists as an economic benefit, there is no allotted budget to provide humanitarian aid to visitors who fall critically ill while on holiday in New Zealand. It was around this time (2003) that a decision had to be made by the Ministry of Health – should the budget for medical treatment of visitors should be taken from the local hospital budget or the Government’s foreign aid budget?

Evans, Malcolm, 1945- :'Show me your wallet!' 'Show me your passport!' New Zealand Herald, 13 May 2003.

Alexander Turnbull Library

Journey into the past

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Tuvalu Islands

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EPIC

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2013 Census: Tuvaluan

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Tuvalu and Australia

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The island of Tuvalu

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Man vs atoll

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Learn Tuvaluan

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The airport runway

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Tuvaluan society

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South Pacific peoples

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Tuvaluan culture

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Samoa

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Fiji

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Niue

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Cook Islands

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Kiribati

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Tokelau

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Digital Pasifik

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