Māori Religious Movements

A DigitalNZ Story by National Library of New Zealand Topics

Pre-European Māori recognised a hierarchy of gods and spiritual influences that connected the community with the environment. While colonialism led to many Māori converting to Christianity it also gave rise to new Māori-centric religions like Ringatu, Pai Mārire and later Ratana. These were led by charismatic leaders including Te Ua Haumēne, Te Whiti, and Rua Kenana. SCIS no: 1895584

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Kiingitanga flags

Kīngitanga flags: Dame Te Atairangikaahu's flag

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kiingitanga

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Ringatū flags: Te Wepu

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Ringatu Church Celebrations

Gisborne Photo News

Ringatu/Te Wepu

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki

Ringatu flag captured from Te Kooti

Alexander Turnbull Library

The seal of the Ringatū Church

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Māori prophetic movements – ngā poropiti: Te Kooti – Ringatū

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Rongopai

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Kooti on Chatham Island

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Pai Mārire karakia, Tataroa

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Turbulent times at Te Hāroto - roadside stories

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Photographer unknown :Portrait of Te Ua

Alexander Turnbull Library

Rua Kenana

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Wiremu Rātana in Taupō

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Ratana Church, Te Kao.

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira

Tahupōtiki Rātana

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Rangiātea church

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Religion and society: Māori and religion

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Traditional Māori religion – ngā karakia a te Māori

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Tohunga Suppression Act

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Ratana Church

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Rātana brass band, Rātana Pā, January 2007

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Kooti

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Ua Haumēne’s flag

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Ua Haumene Horopapera Tuwhakararo

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki

Judith Binney

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Tūhoe timeline

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Captured by Hauhau

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Ringatū

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Wairua

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The Unseen world

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The New Zealand Wars

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Rātana band member

Music represents a major part of the Rātana church, and one of the most striking associations with the church are the Rātana Brass bands (Nga Reo). People may think there is only one Rātana brass band but in fact there are 7 bands. Each has its own identifying colour and uniform and is named after a prominent personality in the Rātana church. The first band Rātana Morehu Silver Band began in 1932 and was often referred to as Te Reo Hiriwa. Some of Rātana’s bands include: 1. TE REO o te Arepa (Ratana Pa) 2. TE REO o Te Omeka (Mangakahia / Auckland) 3. TE REO o Te PiriWiriTua (Kaikohe) 4. TE REO o Te Hamuera (Napier, Taupo, Turangi) 5. TE REO o Te Ratana Te Tua-Toru (Tauranga).

Unveiling Maori Battalion National War Memorial Community Hall, Palmerston North - Ratana band

Alexander Turnbull Library

Te Kooti Memories

In this 1909 article Sergeant-Major Walter Christie, of Wellington gives his impressions of Te Kooti who he met on the Chatham Islands, where Te Kooti was a prisoner. He credited Te Kooti with considerable influence over other Māori prisoners and reckoned him shrewd, intelligent and a “pretty clever chap”. He was those things and much more. To his followers Te Kooti, was a leader, an expert in guerrilla warfare, a visionary prophet and the founder of the Ringatū ("upraised hand") faith. But to some Pakeha colonists, he was seen as a “bloodthirsty wretch”. One of Te Kooti’s extraordinary feats was his escape from the Chatham Islands after being exiled there in 1866.

TE KOOTI MEMORIES. (Clutha Leader 13-7-1909)

National Library of New Zealand

The Tohunga under tapu

This photograph is by the New Zealand Tourist Department and the text has been extracted from James Cowan's book The Maori. What is going on here? Well, it’s all related to the concept of tapu. The woman is attending to a tohunga (priest) who is either temporarily tapu or is so tapu others are required to feed him. The tapu renders him unable to eat therefore he must be fed by someone else, hence the feeding stick. In some circumstances the stick was replaced by a kōrere or feeding funnel. Kōrere were ornately carved instruments used to feed pureed food or liquids to tohunga under tapu or those who were being tattooed (and therefore also under tapu).

[New Zealand Tourist Department?] :The Tohunga under tapu. July, 1933.

Alexander Turnbull Library

Page one from Ko te Katekihama III

This is page one from Ko te Katekihama III or, Church [of England] Catechism in Maori, Kerikeri, 1830. The Lord's prayer was first published in Māori in 1820, and the first Māori edition of the New Testament was printed in 1837. In 1868 the first complete Māori Bible was printed. It is claimed that by 1845 around half of the adult Māori population could read some Māori.

Page one from the Church of England Catechism in Maori, Kerikeri, 1830

Alexander Turnbull Library

Arrest and charges in 1881

After his arrest in 1881 at Parihaka Te Whiti and Tohu’s first trial took place in New Plymouth at the police court. According to a local newspaper at the time Te Whiti was charged with, “wickedly, maliciously, and seditiously contriving and intending to disturb the peace of Her Majesty's subjects, and to incite and move to hatred and dislike of the persons of Her Majesty and the Government, and by inciting numbers of Her Majesty's subjects to insurrection, riots, tumults, and breaches of the peace, and to prevent by force and arms the execution of the laws of this realm, and the preservation.”

TE WHITI IN NEW PLYMOUTH. (Taranaki Herald, 12 November 1881)

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Rua Kēnana

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