Journey of the Treaty of Waitangi

A DigitalNZ Story by National Library of New Zealand Topics

The journey of Te Tiriti o Waitangi | The Treaty of Waitangi and its signatories is as important as Te Tiriti itself. This topic includes the events that followed the signing, and the impacts and shifting attitudes towards Te Tiriti over the years. SCIS no. 1970223

social_sciences, arts, Māori, english

Te Tiriti o Waitangi | Waitangi sheet

Archives New Zealand Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

- Treaty signatories and signing locations

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Tiriti ki Waikato-Manukau | Waikato-Manukau sheet

Archives New Zealand Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

Printed treaty copy

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Tiriti ki Te Moana o Toi Huatahi | Bay of Plenty (Fedarb) sheet

Archives New Zealand Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

Treaty of Waitangi sheets: the Herald

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Waitangi Day 1960s - Waitangi Day

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Protests

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Treaty protest posters: ‘The treaty is a fraud’

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

badge, protest

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira

Protesters with 'Why Celebrate Broken Promises' banner, Waitangi protest

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira

The Treaties

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Protesters with 'Why Celebrate Broken Promises' banner, Waitangi protest

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira

The Treaty

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Pūmuka’s Flag: The mending of many hands

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Te Tiriti o Waitangi : The Cook Strait Sheet.

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Where the Treaty of Waitangi was signed

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Canvassing the Treaty

Services to Schools

Art and the Treaty

Services to Schools

Treaty trail

Services to Schools

Dominion Museum

The Treaty documents that Thomas Hocken discovered in 1908 in the basement of Government Buildings in Wellington were water damaged and partially eaten by rats. In 1913 the documents were sent by Internal Affairs Department to the Dominion Museum in Wellington. It was here that staff began repair work by filling in the holes in the parchment sheets. However, this restoration work caused more damage!

Dominion Museum and Carillon, Buckle Street, Wellington

Alexander Turnbull Library

Dr G H Scholefield

Dr G H Scholefield was a parliamentary librarian at the General Assembly from May 1926 to March 1948. He was also controller of the Dominion Archives in 1931 when the Hawkes Bay earthquake took place. He advised the Department of Internal Affairs that the founding documents should be stored well away from earthquake fault lines, such as those found in Wellington. His advice was ignored, and the documents remained for many years in the Government Buildings.

Dr Guy Scholefield

Alexander Turnbull Library

First New Zealand Day at Waitangi

The Waitangi Day Act 1960 declared that 6 February would be known as Waitangi Day in commemoration of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Prime Minister Norman Kirk in this article answers criticism at Tiriti O Waitangi marae on Waitangi Day 1974 for changing the name to ‘New Zealand Day’. It was the Waitangi Act of 1976 that reinstated the name Waitangi Day.

First New Zealand Day At Waitangi - (Te Ao Hou - No. 75 March 1974)

Alexander Turnbull Library

HMS Herald

In April and May of 1940, Major Thomas Bunbury was responsible for getting signatures for the Treaty in areas in and around the Coromandel. He and his crew travelled on board HMS Herald. This sheet was named The Herald-Bunbury Treaty Sheet after the major and the frigate. Bunbury managed to obtain only 27 signatures. Prior to this, between 1838 and 1842 HMS Herald travelled the world from England to South America, Africa, Asia and the Pacific.

HMS Herald in Sylvan Cove, Stewart Island 1840

Auckland Libraries

This image of Rangi Topeora was taken after the signing of the Treaty. Topeora signed the Cook Strait (Henry Williams) Sheet in Kapiti on 19 April 1840. Other women who signed the treaty were Ereonora at Kaitaia and Ana Hamu at the Bay of Islands. Around 13 women signed the Treaty. As they did not know how to read or write at the time, some signed by drawing a picture of their moko or facial tattoo on the treaty document.

Rangi Topeora

Manatū Taonga, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This is a portrait of Rev William Williams, the brother of Henry Williams, a senior Church Missionary Society missionary who translated the Treaty of Waitangi into Māori. William Williams was given the East Coast Treaty Sheet to obtain signatures of chiefs from the East Cape through to Ahuriri. He collected around 41 signatures. The CMS missionaries and the Wesleyans welcomed the Treaty of Waitangi and helped collect signatures for it.

Rev William Williams

Alexander Turnbull Library

Pohaturoa Rock at Whakatane

This is Pōhaturoa rock in Whakatāne where Ngāti Awa gathers for a dawn ceremony every year on 16 June to celebrate the signing of the Bay of Plenty Sheet by 12 rangatira on 16 June 1840. The sheet was taken around the Bay of Plenty by trader James Fedarb on the schooner Mercury. Anglican missionary Robert Maunsell witnessed the signatures. Gifts of pipes, ditto boxes, looking glasses, tobacco and beads of slate were given out at the Whakatāne signing of the Treaty.

Pohaturoa Rock at Whakatane, showing the memorial to Te Hurinui Apanui.

Alexander Turnbull Library